Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America have we learned enough to get it right? by Antonio Estache

Cover of: Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America | Antonio Estache

Published by World Bank, World Bank Institute, Governance Regulation, and Finance, and Latin America and the Caribbean Region, Finance Private Sector and Infrastructure Sector Unit in Washington, DC .

Written in English

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Places:

  • Latin America.

Subjects:

  • Public utilities -- Latin America.,
  • Privatization -- Latin America.,
  • Poor -- Latin America.,
  • Infrastructure (Economics) -- Latin America.

About the Edition

Do Latin America"s poor households lose from the privatization of infrastructure? How can policymakers minimize the risk of losses while promoting competition and private financing of infrastructure?

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementAntonio Estache, Andrés Gómez-Lobo, Danny Leipziger.
SeriesPolicy research working paper ;, 2407, Policy research working papers (Online) ;, 2407.
ContributionsGómez-Lobo, Andrés., Leipziger, Danny M., World Bank Institute. Governance, Regulation, and Finance Division., World Bank. Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office. Finance, Private Sector, and Infrastructure Dept.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG3881.5.W57
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3669390M
LC Control Number2002616229

Download Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America

2 Utility Privatization and the Needs of the Poor in Latin America: Have We Learned Enough to Get It right. examine how countries may have failed or succeeded. The ultimate good is to provide suggestions as to how to proceed to integrate the interest of the poor into these reforms. Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America - Have we learned enough to get it right.

(Inglês) Resumo. Efforts to reform utilities can affect poor households in varied, often complex, ways, but it is by no means certain that such reform will hurt vulnerable by: Many myths have been perpetuated in discussions of utility reform - and in many cases poor households have benefited from reform.

What is amazing is the extent to which governments, and their advisors - sometimes including multilateral organizations - fail to measure, anticipate, and monitor how the privatization of utilities actually affects Cited by: 6 Utility Privatization and the Needs of the Poor in Latin America: Have We Learned Enough to Get It right.

distribution of this subsidy was highly progressive with more than 72% and 73% of the. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Estache, Antonio. Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America.

Washington, DC: World Bank, World Bank Institute, Governance Regulation, and Finance, and Latin America and the Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America book Region, Finance Private Sector and Infrastructure Sector Unit, Utility Privatization and the Needs of the Poor in Latin America: Have We Learned Enough to Get It Right.

c b. can increase the benefits of utility reform for poor households. The good news is that many measures can be taken to improve the chances that poor households will benefit from reform.

Utility Privatization and the Needs of the. Get this from a library. Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America: have we learned enough to get it right?. [Antonio Estache; Andrés Gámez-Lobo; Danny M Leipziger; World Bank Institute. Governance, Regulation, and Finance Division.; World Bank.

Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office. Finance, Private Sector, and Infrastructure Department.]. Estache, Antonio & Gomez-Lobo, Andres & Leipziger, Danny, "Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America - Have we learned enough to get it right?," Policy Research Working Paper SeriesThe World Bank.

Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps This book provides strong scientific evidence that privatization has been beneficial for many Latin American countries, although some privatizations failed and some groups in society lost out. As usual, the devil is in the details: how privatization is carried out and what reforms accompany it.

In Latin America, the inclusion of service obligations in ‘privatization’ transactions has been a recurring feature during the s and is likely to continue in the foreseeable future to meet the needs of the rural population and the urban poor, particularly in.

Privatization: Successes and Failures evaluates the practices and results of privatization in Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Featuring the world's leading economists and experts on privatization, this volume offers a broad and balanced analysis of specific privatization projects and uncovers some surprising trends.

This document studies several experiences in Latin America regarding utility privatizations and their impact on the poor by capturing the analysis of the policy perspective.

The paper aims to shed light on the issue of who can and does benefit from privatization utilities and to guide policymakers in making the right choices. Authors of study are Danny M. Leipziger, Antonio Estache and Andres. The perception that privatization hurts the poor is growing and creating a backlash against the private provision of basic infrastructure services.

At the same time, governments are findings themselves fisically strapped, searching for ways to finance the large investments needed to expand services to the poor. In Latin America, a laboratory for privatization, evidence exists which sheds light. This book provides a detailed microeconomic analysis of the impact of various privatizations in different countries in the region.

Its central message is that in many cases, contrary to popular belief, society as a whole and in particular the poor have benefited from privatization.

The book presents a careful analysis of the various mechanisms through which privatization has an impact on. In summary, this is a timely, well-written book that makes a relatively novel contribution to the aftermath assessment of utility privatization and regulation in some Latin American and European countries.' - Sergio Galina-Hidalgo, The Journal of Energy and Development.

The perception that water services privatization will negatively affect the poor is growing in many developing countries. Even so, there are some examples where governments have been able to.

The paper provides a tour d'horizon of the “utilities privatization” experience in Latin America, focusing on some outstanding issues surrounding its impact on the poor, and delves into the reasons why its benefits may be undervalued by some, especially the poor. 5 The idea is to take stock but also to help policy-makers improve the.

Estache, Antonio & Gomez-Lobo, Andres & Leipziger, Danny, "Utility privatization and the needs of the poor in Latin America - Have we learned enough to get it right?," Policy Research Working Paper SeriesThe World Bank.

Gustavo Ferro & Andrea Castellano & Chaz Sardi, Utilities Privatization and the Poor: Lessons and Evidence from Latin America. In Latin America, a laboratory for privatization, evidence exists which sheds light on the privatization experience. available to decision-makers who want to increase efficiency while at the same time dealing with the infrastructure needs of the poor that.

The analysis of the distributional impact of privatization activities draws on empirical cases in the utilities sector in a wide range of developing economies, principally in Africa and Latin America.

Whether a casual student of the subject or a specialist on utility privatization and regulation, this book captures the attention of the reader with a structure for each of the 10 chapters that takes one through a succinct yet informative background, thereby setting the tone for understanding the authors hypothesis and conclusions, regardless of whether one agrees with them.

This is an overview of privatization in Latin America in the early 's, which has reference to the Conference on that subject held in Buenos Aires, Argentina in March It presents, in an analytical and comparative manner, the objectives of privatization as pursued in the Latin.

Other topics include: 1) changing roles of the State and business, 2) recent trends in direct foreign investment, and 3) changes in Latin American equity markets.

Valuable contribution"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. The book is organized as follows: chapter one is introduction.

Chapter two outlines changes in the electricity distribution, water and sanitation, and fixed telecommunications sectors in the Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region over the past 15 years.

This chapter tells multiple stories of the substantial improvement in these sectors. Privatization: Successes and Failures evaluates the practices and results of privatization in Eastern Europe, Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Featuring the world's leading economists and experts on privatization, this volume offers a broad and balanced analysis of specific privatization projects and uncovers some surprising s: 2.

The Privatization of Water in Latin America. Karen M. Brummond. With ab cubic meters of water per person, Latin America and the Caribbean have the highest average water availability of all regions (The World Bank Group ).

For this reason, one might fail to consider access to potable water in Latin America as a problem. by Machiko Nissanke and Erik Thorbecke The process of globalization provides a golden opportunity for mankind to contribute to a major reduction of poverty world-wide.

While the potential for povertyreduction is great, the extent of it will depend on many factors including, in particular, the pattern of growth followed by the developed and developing countries and the overall global policy.

The authors also address the widespread impact of privatization on the economy (via macroeconomic influences) and the more general issues of subsidies and regulation which are endemic to these industries.

The book focuses on the reform of four sectors: telecommunications, electricity, gas, and water and sanitation. Privatization in Latin America represents the first systemic economic analysis of the efficiency and distributive effect of privatization in Latin America. Examining the privatization experience of six Latin American countries―Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, and Colombia―Privatization in Latin America evaluates the empirical evidence on privatization and Reviews: 2.

The drive to privatize water distribution and resources is gaining steam in Latin America. Although transnational water companies have suffered setbacks in places like Puerto Rico, Bolivia, and Uruguay, they continue with plans to appropriate the region's hydrological resources-rivers, aquifers, wells, and aqueduct systems.

The wave of privatizations Latin America experienced during the s was integral to stabilization programs and a general reordering of states’ roles in the regional economy. Over the past few years, however, these privatizations have come under increasing fire.

Their purported adverse effects range from higher utility prices to aggravating—or even causing—the current regional recession. Aguas Andinas, for example, a subsidiary of transnationals Agbar and Suez, monopolises Santiago’s market today, selling water to 6 million of the city’s million residents at one of the.

The word privatisation is derived from the latin word “privatus”. Privatisation of water services means transfer of ownership, property or the business of water services from the government to the private sector.

This includes services such as operation and maintenance of water services, bill collection, metering, revenue collection, : Commons or a commodity. Utilities Privatization establishes a partnership and direct investment for both the Air Force and utility system providers because systems are privatized were fiscally attractive and operationally sound.

Privatization of utility systems involves a "bill of sale" conveyance of the real property to a third party, such as a municipal, private. More than of the “returnees” were in the US and France, 14 in Africa and 12 in Latin America.

Those in developing countries tended to be bigger cities than those in richer countries. Poor farming practices, unregulated industrialization and urban poverty have massively and negatively affected Latin America’s water resources. Booming, concentrated populations in Latin America’s mega-cities are devouring and contaminating their water supplies, forcing officials to.

fi rms. Revenues raised from privatization between and totaled just US$ billion in South Asia (World Bank, b). In contrast, Latin America raised over US$ billion over the same period (World Bank, b).

In this chapter we discuss the privatization pro cess in South Asia. Finally, in Latin America and especially in Chile, large-scale privatization programs have been launched, especially in the infrastructure sector, starting in in Chile and peaking in the s.

Between andthe total privatization proceeds in Latin America amounted to $ billion (28% of total world proceeds). "Latin America is trying harder than anywhere else; Latin America is the largest region for successful projects," Mr. Reinhardt said in a telephone interview after touring parts of Mexico's new.

For us in Latin America, America is one continent, not a single country. As Eduardo Galeano writes in his book Open Veins of Latin America. In the s, communism was dead, and privatization was in fashion.

Across the world, policymakers and business leaders assured the public that companies could provide basic utility services of better quality and at a lower cost.Distributive impact on privatization in Latin America: Evidence from Four Countries It is expected that privatization will result in more access to utility service 1-Unsatisfied demand under public ownership Examples: people in Mexico wait 2 years for a phone 2-More expansion of the networks or universal service obligations 3-private firms.At the beginning of the 21st century, Latin America saw an upsurge of grassroots struggle that brought several left governments to power — a historical moment known as the “pink tide.” Yet, in the last few years, popular discontent has grown toward these governments, and far-right leaders, like Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil, have come to power.

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